Timeline.

Thoughts about what I've come across.
  • The Bad Show

    30 July 2018

      

    Radiolab

    Hmm I don't seem to have any of the Radiolab episodes here yet. But please do check out their website. I also loved their episodes around the theme 'Gonads' (gender/sex/identity).

    We all do bad things (right?). One thing that is highlighted is that obedience (as thought in all psy introductory classes) is really about what people feel they ought to do (so not blindly following the experimenter, but doing it from an internal feeling too). We do something that is bad/painful to help/make sacrifices too (i.e. the same bias/heuristic can be positive too).

    Is Fritz Haber good or bad? He invented ammonia. This has fed the world ever since (it's used widely in agriculture). But he also invented chlorine gas (used in WW1). And later CyclonB was used in WW2 concentration camps, based on his inventions. What do you think?

    And do reasons for (bad) behaviour matter? The last part of the episode is about the Green River killer. Why did he do it? What was the meaning?

    Listen to the episode

  • Steve Madden: Steve Madden

    30 July 2018

      

    How I Built This

    Steve started his entrepreneurial journey by learning from others. He was mentored by another person in the shoe business. But after a while he was eager to spread his wings and be his own boss.

    Steve Maddon participated in the pump & dump schemes as portrait in Wolf of Wall Street. He stated that the boiler room depictions in the movie were true to life. He eventually spent time in jail and did quite some drugs around that period.

    One nugget from the episode was that he found a different market (audience) for his product than expected. He was targetting people his age but found that younger kids bought the shoes. The same goes for where he craved respect (the industry people) and later found it from others.

    Guy always asks the entrepreneurs "Was it luck or talent?". Steve answer was about windows of opportunity. You've got to grasp those. So (as always) it's a combination.

    Listen to the episode

  • The Psychology of Money

    27 July 2018

      

    Article

    In investing there can be people with no background, with no study, who can outperform others who's job it is to do financial work. Someone who just saves every month can have more money in the bank than an investment banker who spends it all.

    "Managing money isn't necessarily about what you know; it's about how you behave."

    Here are twenty biases, flaws, and mental fallacies.

    • Earned success and deserved failure fallacy: A tendency to underestimate the role of luck and risk, and a failure to recognize that luck and risk are different sides of the same coin.
    • Cost avoidance syndrome: A failure to identify the true costs of a situation, with too much emphasis on financial costs while ignoring the emotional price that must be paid to win a reward.
    • Rich man in the car paradox. The paradox of wealth is that people tend to want it to signal to others that they should be liked and admired.
    • A tendency to adjust to current circumstances in a way that makes forecasting your future desires and actions difficult, resulting in the inability to capture long-term compounding rewards that come from current decisions.
    • Anchored-to-your-own-history bias: Your personal experiences make up maybe 0.00000001% of what’s happened in the world but maybe 80% of how you think the world works.
    • Historians are Prophets fallacy: Not seeing the irony that history is the study of surprises and changes while using it as a guide to the future. An overreliance on past data as a signal to future conditions in a field where innovation and change is the lifeblood of progress.
    • The seduction of pessimism in a world where optimism is the most reasonable stance.
    • Underappreciating the power of compounding, driven by the tendency to intuitively think about exponential growth in linear terms.
    • Attachment to social proof in a field that demands contrarian thinking to achieve above-average results.
    • An appeal to academia in a field that is governed not by clean rules but loose and unpredictable trends.
    • The social utility of money coming at the direct expense of growing money; wealth is what you don’t see.
    • A tendency toward action in a field where the first rule of compounding is to never interrupt it unnecessarily.
    • Underestimating the need for room for error, not just financially but mentally and physically.
    • A tendency to be influenced by the actions of other people who are playing a different financial game than you are.
    • An attachment to financial entertainment due to the fact that money is emotional, and emotions are revved up by argument, extreme views, flashing lights, and threats to your wellbeing.

    If there’s a common denominator in these, it’s a preference for humility, adaptability, long time horizons, and skepticism of popularity around anything involving money. Which can be summed up as: Be prepared to roll with the punches.

    Read the article

  • On B2B2C Business Models

    27 July 2018

      

    Article

    This article is about B2B2C companies, but I actually expected it to be about Channel partnerships / other ways of doing B2B2C.

    "B2B2C is where your company sells a product/service to a business, gaining customers and/or data from that business that you get to keep and use. And where, most importantly, that group of customers becomes untethered from the middle B — at some point, they recognize that YOU (the first B!) are the product they use."

    "...well-structured set of business deals led to lots of downstream consumers with no per-customer acquisition cost."

    • B2B2C is easiest to sell when Business A does NOT want to be in the business you are offering
    • Don’t tickle the bear — optimize for early clients first, as keeping track of “what can I do with differently-acquired groups of customers” is unwieldy.
    • Give > Get: a logical time to “flex” end-customer ownership is when you are able to contribute more to Business A than you receive from Business A.
    • The “exhaust” of a B2B2C business is either customers or their data. It’s essential that end customers identify as customers of your Business B if you have a plan to count them as yours (and the same applies to data).
    • A signed contract is just the beginning of the sale.

    Read the article

  • How To Live Life On Your Own Terms

    24 July 2018

      

    Tim Ferriss

    “I’m pretty oblivious to a lot of things intentionally. I don’t want to be influenced that much.” - Jason Fried

    I'm a fan of Jason Fried (and DHH) of Basecamp fame. I use Basecamp daily and love how they look at business. Rework is my most re-read business book to date. Here are some of my notes from the episode.

    • Jason doesn't follow dogma. He doesn't follow news, or industry news. He therefore needs to busy himself by developing his own (original) ideas.
    • He has no goals, no planning (personally), he just goes where he needs to go. (I have become more accustomed to this idea over the past years, but still like to make goals to give direction. I think his direction/mission/vision may be more internalized, or that he really has none, which may be a more 'budda' way of living).
    • "Comparison is the death of joy"
    • So how does he make good decisions? For Basecamp it means they have 6 week cycles (with 2 weeks of down/thinking-time in between.
    • He has no expectations. Say your goal was 21% growth last year, and you only have 20%, you may be very dissapointed. This is crazy, it's all in your heard. He argues that intrinsic motivation is much better.
    • This aligns with the ideas from Triggers, about doing your best, that is good enough. And also makes me think of the concept of 'circle of control'. This is also mentioned in Triggers7 Habits of Highly Effective People.
    • Jason uses the example of running that triggered him to think this way. He was first trying to beat a certain time. But he got frustrated every time he didn't make that. So he just let go, he put his focus on enjoying running and doing his best. I like that he then didn't go on to say that he achieved the original goal, no he just enjoyed running.
    • Jason tries to have as little anxiety as possible in his life. So he doesn't read news online, he does read the IRL newspaper once a day.
    • He argues that life is not that complicated. We make it that way. He mentions Seeking Wisdom (book I haven't read). And argues that we make it complex as a sport for ourselves (i.e. to keep ourselves busy).
    • They also touch upon Stoicism (philosphy) and mention A Guide to the Good Life which is a great introduction to Stoicism. Negative visualisation, confronting fear head on instead of letting it linger in the background of your mind.
    • "Make something for yourself, and find others like you." (great business advice) (but don't forget to tell the others)
    • Jason doesn't commit to things far away in the future. He thinks Warren Buffet does the same. He likes to have no hassle. And you can easily commit to something far away, but when it comes you still pay the costs (e.g. time). When telling someone no (e.g. a speaking engagement in the future) he is honest about why he won't do it, people appreciate that and accept it.
    • People protect their money, they should do the same with their time. This is a learned skill.
    • When hiring people Jason (read: Basecamp) looks at if they are great writers. It shows great communication skills and is important for many people, even designers. It shows how they can present themselves to the world. And much of that presentation is in written for these days.
    • If he could teach a course it would be about writing. It would teach iteration, something we do in real life (e.g. the iterations of this post or webite) and which isn't really thought in school. He would let people write a long essay (a few pages), then write a shorter version (a few times) to teach the relevant skills.

    Listen to the episode

  • Globalism on the Brink

    23 July 2018

      

    Sam Harris

    Sam Harris speaks with political analyst Ian Bremmer. What I took away from the conversation is a better understanding of the worries about globalism and some of the troubling times we're facing.

    • There are legitimate concerns from 'them/the other side'. This refers to the worries that many people on the (extreme) right voice, but also something that is on the mind of the average person. What about immigration, what about globalism? What about jobs? And not all concerns are valid (jobs are lost to automation). But we must understand before we can start solving the problem.
    • In the conversation they define globalism as the political idea of free trade and global security. Ian argues that this in essence is a good idea.
    • Globalisation is the real-world implementation of this idea. This is the economic impact and also can be considered as something that lifts all boats.
    • Cosmopolitan is defined as someone who feels like he/she is a citizen of the world. The opposite is identity politics (which Sam earlier argued that Ezra Klein and others on the left and many on the right are engaging in). Facebook is responsible for quite a lot of the polarization and us-them divide.
    • Ian argues, and I agree, that cellphones are also to blame. He uses an example of going to jury duty and there was no interaction amongst the (very diverse) New Yorkers that were there (200+ people, watching a training video). From the same experience 6 years ago he still was in contact with some people.
    • People (the 'them' from before) have legit concerns around globalisation. The costs for Germany for the immigrants that they take on are actually great. Turkey, Jordan and many African countries are also facing the high costs of caring for refugees. I think that we can argue that it's our duty to do so, but I also understand that not everyone sees it this way and that change is almost always received in a negative way.
    • Other legitimate concerns are around crime (higher for migrant communities), bad integration (which also means less intelligence for police), radicalism, and fear of outsiders from the community that is seeing change. Ian also mentions that Trump grew up in a white neighbourhood that saw much diversification over his youth.
    • In today's discourse there is no room for complexity and nuance.
    • Ian also mentioned the automation which made me think of Humans Need Not Apply - Jerry Kaplan
    • With automation Ian thinks that many developing countries will have significant problems with many people who won't have a job. America will be ok, he thinks, it's rich enough. China will be able to give people 'bullshit' jobs (I heard the term sowhere else). But countries like India, Tunis and others won't be able to do th is.
    • Ian thinks that UBI is interesting, but he would like to see a more complete model that includes things like job training.
    • Wealth inequality is too high (see Guardian article). People feel that they have no opportunities. Healthcare is becoming more expensive. Schooling in America is failing. And there is little political discourse on the national level. He believe that redistribution is something that is happening on the local level and through philanthropy (but of course you want this to happen on the national level).
    • One example of a country that is still thriving is Japan. But this example is quite different from other countries because of the ageing population and little immigration. This example, unfortunately, is also therefore used by alt-right groups to justify their viewpoints.
    • Ian believes that the trade war is only a dispute and that America has more to lose. China is making their own Marshall plan (Belt and Road initiative, explainer video). It's more transactional than the US version decades ago. But for the US to thrive they should keep friendly with their allies (read: EU).

    Listen to the episode

  • Groen in glas

    15 July 2018

     

        

    I read this book over the weekend at Lotte. And it's about growing plants in glass. I've made a few ones and hope that they will stay alive over the coming weeks/years. Here is a translated excerpt.

    "Green in glass is for everyone who loves plants and green in the house. Plants in a bottle - both 'open' and 'closed' - form an eye-catcher in your interior. Green blogger Judith Baehner shows in her book what forms of terrariums there are and how you organize and maintain them. With the many step by step photos everyone can get started."

  • The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O. - Neal Stephenson

    30 June 2018

     

        

    Neal Stephenson is well known for his sci-fi books. Some are deep into the tech world, and 'Dodo' was a step away from there. It featured witches, time-travel and more shenanigans. I enjoyed the (long) book, but it veared of course quite a few times for me. The narrative was long and sometimes I think it could have established what he wanted with less fluff.

    Nonetheless it was a great book that had a strong narrative and was as cohesive as it could be with time-travel in the mix. There is even some 'hard' science with regards to quantum states so that's interesting too.

    Read the full review (TBD)

  • Public Commitment 2018 Update

    10 July 2018

      

    Floris Wolswijk

    I've updated my goals for this year. In the blog post I reflect on how the year has been going and what my plans are for Q3 and Q4.

    I'm happy with where my life is at the moment. I'm working actively on my fitness goals. I could make more time for writing and still want to spend less time doing 'useless' things like watching YouTube.

    Read the blog

  • Freeing the Hostages

    10 July 2018

      

    Sam Harris

    Sam Harris speaks with FBI negotiator Chris Voss. In the conversation they touch upon different topics related to hostage situations and how to resolve them.

    • When you open up communication with the bad guys, you always learn information (e.g. the way they speak, or they reveal with how many they are).
    • Following the money is easy and can lead to you catching the whole gang instead of just a few.
    • If captured, humanise yourself (let them say your name to get you to move)
    • Kidnapping is way more common in non-western countries (e.g. about 3000 in Mexico per year).
    • Use the 'fear of loss' heuristic as named by Kahneman (see Thinking: Fast and Slow)
    • Copy/mirror the language the other person is using (even outside hostage situations)
    • Deception will only give you short-term gains, so never use it.
    • Profit in most cases isn't made in the headline number, but in the way you get it (e.g. 1000 dollar days for FBI operators are good, but not if you only have 1 per month, then you better can do more 500 dollar days without travel time)
    • Anger, like deception, also never gives you long-term success.

    Listen to the episode

  • Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey

    09 July 2018

      

    Series

    I started rewatching this series hosted by Neil deGrasse Tyson. It's very educative and inspiring. I've made some notes for myself. I will add to these in the future and sometimes post again that I've watched another (few) episode(s).

    Read my notes

  • Never Underestimate Your First Idea

    08 July 2018

      

    Masters of Scale

    Reid Hoffman interviews Ev Williams from Twitter, Blogger, and Medium. He has always had one driving idea behind his ventures. He wasn't that successful in the beginning (or at all back then), but he had perseverance. And he had a big idea, of spreading ideas. That is what made him continue and thrive.

    “There is great stuff in the minds out there in the world, and the Internet is this big machine that connects them.”

    Listen to the episode

  • Effective Altruism Discussion Evening #4

    04 July 2018

      

    Effective Altruism

    During the evening we learned about why factory farming is bad (animal suffering, environment, human suffering). We discussed the ways that people are tackling the problem. Both with regard to our consumption, the conditions in the factory farms, and to offering alternatives. One of my biggest takeaways is that we won’t easily (or at all) change people’s behaviour, but that institutional change may be able to nudge a lot of people into making better choices.

    More notes from the evening

    Be there at the next meetup

  • Chicken Salad Chick: Stacy Brown

    03 July 2018

      

    How I Built This

    What if you could take such a simple, and maybe even niche, concept as chicken salad (sandwiches) and make that into a $75M business? That is what Stacy Brown did. It took a lot of courage, conviction, perseverance, and guts.

    Although the story of a chicken salad company didn't sound inspiring, I found the story very moving. Stacy went through a lot of things and she persevered. From last minute investments to the tragic story of her husbands fight with cancer. Listen and be inspired.

    Listen to the episode

  • Dictators, Immigration, #metoo, and Other Imponderables

    02 July 2018

      

    Sam Harris

    "In this episode of the Waking Up podcast, Sam Harris speaks with Masha Gessen about Vladimir Putin, the problem of gouging public opinion in Russia, Trump’s fondness for dictators, the challenges of immigration, comparisons between Christian and Muslim intolerance, “fake news” and the health of journalism, the #MeToo movement, and other topics"

    What struck me as particularly interesting is that Masha mentions that there really is no public opinion in Russia. She has to reiterate that a few times before Sam hears it. She means to say that people there really don't have an opinion and just follow exactly what the media says they should think. That is pretty crazy. How is that here? How much are we influenced or are we capable of forming our own opinions? (I hope we do (still) have that ability).

    Masha also calls Sam out on a switch and bait. He compares the attitudes of Christian Americans and all Muslims on homosexuality. He says the former would never kill a person over that, but the latter would (i.e. almost all of the would find it ok if someone was killed because they were gay). But that is excluding the millions of Christians around the world who would kill a homosexual. And while that is very bad too, it shows that Muslims aren't the only ones with hateful/wrong views.

    Listen to the episode

  • Cal Fussman Corners Tim Ferriss

    02 July 2018

      

    Tim Ferriss

    This interview took a deep dive into the history of Tim Ferriss. It showed how the pieces from an early age made the Tim of today possible.

    One lesson is: Get an audience, then sell a product. That way you risk less (e.g. having 100 books without readers). And it also allows you to validate the idea beforehand.

    Tim tried different things, but all had a purpose in mind. He was relentless in trying. He kept calling, emailing and showing up and doing the work.

    Listen to the episode

  • The Network Man

    02 July 2018

      

    Article

    This article is about Reid Hoffman, the founder of LinkedIn. And how he goes about his life.

    He starts his dinners with a list of things to discuss. That is an excellent way to see what you both want to get out of the conversation and for things to linger before you talk about them.

    He is an 'ubernode', he is more connected that almost anyone in the world. One of the reasons is that his vision is so clear. "His project is to build a better world, whose outlines are much clearer to him than to most people."

    "“How can I be helpful?” All his activities are in the service of the same cause: to make it possible for more people to operate the way he does."

    The rest of the article talks about his life, how he sees the world and what is goals are.

    He mentions Peter Thiel (PayPal, and very controversial). And also notes that Snowcrash (TBD) had a significant influence on him.

    "He told me that in Silicon Valley prestige is not especially important, which means that there is an assumed equivalence between numerically measurable performance and social value."

    "Hoffman was especially good at finding some degree of moderation in relations with the world as it exists, without abandoning aggressive behavior."

    "There was no middle class, then there was a middle class, now we’re back where we started—it’s hollowed out. I don’t see where the middle class is going to come from. You’ll start seeing more conversation about a guaranteed income. Right now, there’s an absolute belief that markets can solve everything—software can."

    "Once network effects really kick in, they create a powerful barrier to entry for potential rivals: the more effort you’ve put into your identity on Facebook or LinkedIn or YouTube, the more difficult it becomes for you to switch to a competitor." (for more, see Zero to One (TBD))

    Read the article

  • Effective Altruism Global X Netherlands

    1 July 2018

      

    Effective Altruism

    During the EAGx in The Netherlands I enjoyed being together with others who are changing the world with the EA mindset. I presented around combining EA with entrepreneurship and went to a few workshops myself too. Mental health was one of the topics of interest that evening and some people are taking active steps towards addressing that cause area.

    The Event

    Be there at the next Rotterdam meetup

  • The Happy Body - Aniela & Jerzy Gregorek

    30 June 2018

     

         

    I first heard about this book via an interview on the Tim Ferriss podcast. Jerzy Gregorek is a well-known trainer and weightlifter. The book is full of tips around making a stronger body. He states that it all boils down to flexibility, strength and speed. And that the latter informs/helps the first two.

    The book is good in so far as that it has good exercises and comes from a good place of knowledge. The writing, formatting and testimonials aren't that well done.

    Read the full review

  • Tara Mac Aulay - Fixing without asking permission

    30 June 2018

      

    80000 hours

    This was a great interview about the role of operations within the Effective Altruism community. Tara shows how she has made vast improvements by applying her mindset. From saving millions at a hospital to now leading one of the EA organisations.

    "You don’t need permission. You don’t need to be allowed to do something that’s not in your job description. If you think that it’s gonna make your company or your organization more successful and more efficient, you can often just go and do it."

    Listen to the episode

  • The entropic brain: A theory of conscious states informed by neuroimaging research with psychedelic drugs

    27 June 2018

      

    Article

    "Based on neuroimaging data with psilocybin, a classic psychedelic drug,it is argued that the defining feature of “primary states” is elevated entropy (disorder) in certain aspects of brain function."

    "This entropy suppression furnishes normalwaking consciousness with a constrained quality and associated metacognitive functions, including reality-testing and self-awareness."

    "Entry into primary states depends on a collapse of the normally highly organized activity within the default-mode network (DMN) and a decoupling between the DMN and the medial temporal lobes(which are normally significantly coupled."

    I forgot how I got linked to this article, but I find it to provide an interesting look into our consciousness. I only superficially understand what is written. Feel free to discuss the paper with me if you know more.

    Read the article

  • Andrew Chen - How startups die from their addiction to paid marketing

    27 June 2018

      

    Article

    Startups that grow can fool themselves about the Customer Acquisition Costs (CAC). When spending goes up it becomes harder to track, not easier. You may be able to acquire customers at a profit, but not with the overhead you have in the company.

    There is a Paid Marketing Local Max (the max amount you can spend that is smart to do). You must understand each channel by itself, not lump everything together. When you grow, the CAC may go up. The virality of your first customers is much higher than consequent ones.

    The ads themselves become less effective over time. They grow stale, people have seen them before. And there is (more) competition as time goes by.

    "The new generation of ad platforms makes it possible to scale revenue to new heights, but without profitability."

    "So for those of you who are thinking about going all-in on paid marketing, I challenge you to go deeper on that strategy. Perhaps cap your paid acquisition at 30-40% of TOF. Instead, where can you innovate?"

    So, think smarter and in many cases don't put all your eggs in the Paid Acquisition basket!

    Read the article

  • Tim Ferriss Goes to Maximum Security Prison

    27 June 2018

      

    Tim Ferriss

    A moving interview with 3 inmates in a Maximum Security Prison. Tim talks with them about the work they are doing with Defy Ventures. They are becoming entrepreneurs (Entrepreneurs in Training, EIT) and they are working from the inside (literally) to make the prison system and life afterwards better.

    I love how Tim is doing his best to speak to different people and how he is spreading the work of Defy Ventures. I'm not aware of similar programs in The Netherlands, but I would very strongly encourage it.

    Another episode with the founder of Defy, Catherine Hoke. And also read from the perspective of Brad Felt (Venture Capitalist).

    Listen to the episode

  • John Doerr - Why the secret to success is setting the right goals

    27 June 2018

      

    TED Talk

    Renowned venture capitalist John Doerr explains how we can use 'Objectives and Key Results' as a system to aim for, and reach, better goals. We can use them to be accountable, to know what we're working towards, and to better communicate with others in our team or the wider world.

    This talk reminds me of The Effective Executive (TBD). I think the commonality is that you do what you measure, and in many cases we measure nothing.

    Watch the TED Talk

  • Being Mortal - Atul Gawande

    26 June 2018

     

         

    What does it mean to live into old age? This is the central question I think that Atul Gawande poses. It's not perse about dying (though it of course also is), it's about the process towards it. He tells amazing stories of people who are becoming old. He takes us on a journey of how we've cared for them, and where we can improve. The book confronts us with our mortality.

    At around the same time as reading this book, I became aware that Gawande has been chosen to lead the health care company founded/financed by Warren Buffet, Jeff Bezos, and Jamie Dimon (of Berkshire Hathaway, Amazon, and JPMorgan Chase). I'm very interested to see where this will take him, and his amazing view on life. (Techcrunch, Forbes, Statnews).

    Read the full review

  • Hannah Fry - Is life really that complex?

    25 June 2018

      

    TED Talk

    We can explain many things in life. From the really small, to the really big. From the movement of a ball, to the movement of galaxies. But we're not very good at explaining what lies in between, the complex. Hannah Fry argues that with new techniques we will be able to do so. And with that we may be able to predict the behaviour of crowds, or predict how the stock market will move.

    I find it fascinating to see how this thinking connects disparate fields and will give us more insight into who we are. There is more on this in Deep Simplicity (TBD) and The Quark and the Jaguar (TBD).

    Watch the TED Talk

  • Liz Lambert - The Unstoppable Hotelier

    21 June 2018

      

    Tim Ferriss

    An interview with Liz Lambert and her journey through building her hotel. It's a story of perseverance, of believing in herself and her mission. At the same time also a story about enjoying the journey. About the journey being the destination. And believing that happiness can be found right there. The podcast is also about how she used design to make life better for others.

    Listen to the episode

  • Lululemon Athletica

    21 June 2018

      

    How I Built This

    The story of Chip Wilson and how he built one of the largest apparel companies in the world. One of the lessons is that he was keen on watching the trends and moving with them (or stepping out when he couldn't). He wasn't a yoga person, but he definitely was a fabric and fashion person. He built his team, and tried to make them excel.

    Listen to the episode

  • Universal Basic Income

    19 June 2018

      

    Sam Harris

    Sam Harris speaks with Andrew Yang about Universal Basic Income (TBD). It once again presents more information that convinces me that this is a good idea. It highlights some places where it has already been implemented and how it helps both financially as mentally (and allows people to do more meaningful work).

    They also touch upon some criticism of UBI. The funding is addressed, and shown to be possible and some of the positive side-effects may even be cheaper than our current system. People will not become sloths and do nothing all day if they get a guaranteed income. This income probably is also below the poverty line and many people can/should/will do additional jobs.

    One other point, not always highlighted, is that we just don't have jobs for many people any more. Many college graduates aren't finding jobs. Many people have left the workforce entirely. And this is all before the real AI automation will start. The top 5 jobs (e.g. trucking, working in retail) will be automated away. And yes there will be some new jobs but don't tell me a truck driver will easily become the new fleet coordinator.

    This podcast has given me more information to think about UBI and has added to my positive attitude towards the idea.

    Listen to the episode

  • The Paper Menagerie - Ken Liu

    20 June 2018

     

         

    I first learned about Ken Liu as translator of the Three Body Problem (and the two other books in the triology). His short stories are a mix of hard sci-fi (think: consciousnesses drifting around space) to moving stories of immigrants who've come from China to the US. I can highly recommend this collection of his short stories.

    Read the full review (TBD)

  • The Green Pill

    14 June 2018

      

    Ezra Klein

    Ezra Klein interviews Melanie Joy about why we eat meat. It's a very interesting conversation that touches about some of our deepest routed beliefs. Joy defines the 'normal' way of eating as Carnism and that gives a new perspective to see the world through. I still find it difficult to think of what to best tell my meat eating friends. One of the good points made was that everyone really wants to do good. Many people just don't think about the suffering related to their consumption. I do the same when eating eggs. And on a positive note, veganism as a movement is growing rapidly. Trying your best is really how we should judge ourselves (and possibly others), and making progress (speaking for myself) is what will move things in the right direction.

    Listen to the episode

  • Effective Altruism Intro #19

    13 June 2018

      

    Effective Altruism

    In this fourteenth meetup we again gave some people a peak into the EA kitchen. We discussed charities, why some are neglected, what role our psychology and the 'attractiveness' of charities play. In the end I hope the participants are able to find more information on 80000hours.org to further shape their careers.

    Be there at the next meetup

  • The Undoing Project - Michael Lewis

    13 June 2018

     

         

    Michael Lewis follows the story of two psychologists who have changed the world. Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky lay bare our heuristics, biases and challenge the 'econ' model of mankind. Take a journey through their lives, discover their past and own hidden motives.

    Read the full review (TBD)

  • How to Succeed in High-Stress Situations

    12 June 2018

      

    Tim Ferriss

    This hour of the Tim Ferriss Show is a commentated reading of The Obstacle Is The Way by Ryan Holiday. Tim offers some of his own unique perspective. I took away some reminders of Stoic philosophy. One of them is to enjoy the struggle/obstacle/journey/life. To embrace what is coming to you and to be present to enjoy the experience.

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  • The Elephant in the Brain - Kevin Simler & Robin Hanson

    18 May 2018

     

         

    You don't talk about the elephant in the room. Nor do you talk about the hidden motives that drive your everyday life. In this riveting book you take a deep dive into the science of why we conceal motives from ourselves (and others). Then it's applied to various areas in life, from school to medicine. You won't look at any person or system the same after reading this book.

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